#LoveInstyle: Christian Louboutin

Today is #LoveInstyle and we dedicate our inspiration to LoveInspired brands.

Today’s inspiration is related to shoes (our pleasure and pain).  The most attractive and love appealing shoe is a… right a pair of Louboutins. They are not only representing the love colours red and black but no fashionista could’t resist not having this love inspired stilettos.

Let’s have a closer look at the maker of the famous….

Christian Louboutin

Christian Louboutin (born 7 January 1963) is a French luxury footwear and fashion designer whose footwear has incorporated shiny, red-lacquered soles that have become his signature.

Louboutin began sketching shoes in his early teens, ignoring his academic studies. Going through a punk phase. His first job was at the Folies Bergères, the cabaret where he assisted the entertainers backstage. His little formal training included drawing and the decorative arts at the Académie d’Art Roederer. Louboutin claims his fascination with shoes began in 1976, when he visited the Musée national des Arts d’Afrique et d’Océanie on the avenue Daumesnil. It was there that he saw a sign from Africa forbidding women wearing sharp stilettos from entering a building for fear of damage to the extensive wood flooring. This image stayed in his mind, and he later used this idea in his designs.

“I wanted to defy that,” Louboutin said. “I wanted to create something that broke rules and made women feel confident and empowered.”

Fascinated by world cultures, he ran away in his teens to Egypt and spent a year in India. Louboutin returned to Paris in 1981, where he assembled a portfolio of drawings of elaborate high heels. He brought it to the top couture houses. The effort resulted in employment with Charles Jourdan. Subsequently, Louboutin met Roger Vivier, who claims to have invented the stiletto, or spiked-heel shoe. Louboutin became an apprentice in Vivier’s atelier. Going on to serve as a freelance designer, Louboutin designed women’s shoes for Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent, and Maud Frizon. In the late 1980s, he turned away from fashion to become a landscape gardener and to contribute to Vogue but missed working with shoes and set up his company in 1991.

With funds from two backers, he opened a Paris shoe salon in 1991 with Princess Caroline of Monaco as his first customer. She complimented the store one day when a fashion journalist was present, and the journalist’s subsequent publication of Princess’ comments helped greatly to increase Louboutin’s renown. Clients such as Diane von Fürstenbergand Catherine Deneuve followed.

The red sole was born, so the legend goes, when Louboutin was inspecting prototypes for a collection in 1993. Dissatisfied with the impression a black sole made with the design of the upper, he grabbed an assistant’s nail varnish and began to lacquer the shoe’s underside.

You can immediately tell when a woman is wearing a pair of Louboutins:
her posture is perfect and she doesn’t walk anywhere.

Whether covered in sequins and frills of ribbon, or simply in highly polished patent black, the French designer’s shoes are known for their lengthening, tautening and perkifying effects.

“Louboutin’s design is very optimistic,” says Harriet Quick, fashion features director at Vogue. “It’s that quality that French designers do so well – a certain joie de vivre”.

reference (eu.christianlouboutin.com/uk_en/ and independant.co.uk)

“A shoe has so much more to offer than just to walk” so Christian Louboutin
Our LoveStory response to that is:
“A bag has so much more to offer than just an item to carry objects”, we capture the moment and tell your personal LoveStory.

Stay tuned, stay inspired, stay in love!

 

 

 

 

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