The big idea- 
deconstruction journey

„Every day we have ideas. They are the most profound of products that we as humans generate.“ (Hegaty, 2014, p.g.16)

We all have ideas. The most difficult part is to bring the big idea to live. To gain a better understanding of the „making process“ I started with the deconstruction journey. Deconstruction (French: déconstruction) is a method of critical analysis of philosophical and literary texts based on Jacques Derrida’s 1967 work Of Grammatology.

Taking inspiration from case studies being made in the bag luxury industry like “anatomy of bags deconstruction work”. My aim was to gain insight on the process. In this case, I bought two bags from an affordable high street brand and literally took them in all their single parts apart.

It was incredible to see how many pieces “you need” to create an item which was probably made in a factory in a mass production process. Mass production is the production of large amounts of standardized products, including and especially on assembly lines.

The „yellow bag“ requires 19 single pieces to realize the end result of the bag. The most challenging aspect of the deconstruction process was the “glue technique” which was not so accurate and made by a machine in a factory. It’s the kind of attention that a handmade piece would consider a more detailed expertise.

Yellow bag in numbers:
19- Numbers of total parts
1- Hour of craftsmanship required to take a single bag apart

The „pink bag“ requires 35 single pieces to realize the end result of the bag. The most challenging aspect of the deconstruction process were the metal items which were not easy taking apart with a size. It’s the kind of attention that a handmade piece would probably consider a “special material and attention to detail”.

Pink bag in numbers:
35- Number of total parts
2- Hours of craftsmanship required to take a single bag apart

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